Get the Scoop on an Immigrant Church in 1900 from Zi Prete—Bishop Edmund Dunne 1914 of time at Holy Guardian Angel Italian Parish ca 1900

Memoir of Zi Prete—Bishop Edmund Dunne 1914 of his time at Holy Guardian Angel Italian Parish ca 1900  —below is a link to the full text.  Beneath that link is the foreword and table of contents imperfectly scanned of one of the best accounts by a priest of the conditions among Chicago Italian Catholics circa 1900.

Bishop of Peoria 1909-1929 Edward M. Dunne, the second bishop of Peoria, was born into an Irish family that traced its history back to the 12th century. From his early boyhood in Chicago, and all through his student years at Holy Name Parish, St. Ignatius College, Niagara University, and later in Belgium and in Rome, his training was always directed toward the priesthood. And when, in September 1909, he was consecrated bishop of Peoria, succeeding Archbishop John Lancaster Spalding, there were those who said, "I could have told you so." His life, it has recorded, was a lesson in persistent endeavor. He worked in Chicago parishes and in the ethnic neighborhoods where his knowledge of Latin, English, Italian, Polish, modern Greek and French were valuable, and where his gift for music was recognized. He gained many distinctions and a reputation for hard work, all of which served to influence Archbishop James E. Quigley of Chicago who chose him be chancellor of his diocese, a post he held until his appointment to Peoria.

Bishop of Peoria 1909-1929
Edward M. Dunne, the second bishop of Peoria, was born into an Irish family that traced its history back to the 12th century.
From his early boyhood in Chicago, and all through his student years at Holy Name Parish, St. Ignatius College, Niagara University, and later in Belgium and in Rome, his training was always directed toward the priesthood.
And when, in September 1909, he was consecrated bishop of Peoria, succeeding Archbishop John Lancaster Spalding, there were those who said, “I could have told you so.”
His life, it has recorded, was a lesson in persistent endeavor. He worked in Chicago parishes and in the ethnic neighborhoods where his knowledge of Latin, English, Italian, Polish, modern Greek and French were valuable, and where his gift for music was recognized.
He gained many distinctions and a reputation for hard work, all of which served to influence Archbishop James E. Quigley of Chicago who chose him be chancellor of his diocese, a post he held until his appointment to Peoria.

Click for   Full Text of Edmund M. Dunne”s Memoir of his time at Holy Guardian Angel Italian Church in Chicago

 

MEMOIRS OF ZI PRETE

EDMUND M. DUNNE, D.D. 
Bishop of Peoria
Copyright, 1914

FOREWORD 
The present booklet treats o£ a few doctrinal 
points unavoidably omitted in a former tract 
bearing the titíe of " Polemic Chat." When 
these Memoirs began to appear seríally in the 
.Peoria Cathedral Calendar, a friendly critic 
remarked : " The Bishop is utilizing his paro- 
chial experiences among the Italians ' to point a 
moral and adom a tale.'" Precisely. Our 
chief aim in the present chronology of events is 
>^ to instruct the people, "to preach the word in 
0> season and out of season, reproving, entreating, 
rebuking in all patience and doctrine." 

Several anachronisms as well as changes in 
the names and occupations of the characters háve 
been purposely introduced, so that the ingenuity 
of even a Sherlock Holmes might be baffled 
should he attempt to identify them with certain 
individuals of the Italian colony. 

Some may deem Pasqualino too clever for his 
tender age. Unusquisque abundat sensu suo. 
Please consider, friendly or hostile reader, as 
the čase may be, that our youthful polemist had 
completed three years of classics with unusual 
success before encountering his adversary. The 

FOREWORD 

children of sunny Italy develop múch earlier 
than those of northern climes. Youthf ul prodi- 
gies bud f orth occasíonally in the realm of litera- 
túre, poetry, painting, music and mathematics. 
Why should they not blossom also in the field of 
polemics? Besides, were Pasqualino a youth of 
mediocre talent, his utterances would not be 
worth recording. At any rate it is úpon them 
and not úpon his personality that we wish to 
f ocus your attention. 

Pasqualino's father represents indeed no par- 
ticular individual, but rather the composite em- 
bodiment of reprehensible traits which Zi Pre' 
had ample occasion to reprove among the malé 
members of his flock. The exemplary Christian 
virtues of the mother háve not been overdrawn. 
The most elaboráte portrayal of maternal solici- 
tude and self-sacrifice falls, as a generál rule, 
immeasurably below the reality. 

The tactics of Evangelical zealots to wrest 
Italian children from the One True Fold, are 
melancholy facts familiar to the hundred or 
more Sunday School teachers of Guardian Angel 
Mission. The conversion of the proselytizer, 
his subsequent public reparation and edifying 
death are true in every detail. 

The Author. 

CONTENTS 

CHAPTER PAGE 

I Italian Quarter I 

II Italian Customs 13 

III Proselytizers 19 

IV Pasquaulino 28 

V Early Training 39 

VI MlSNOMER FOR A SCHOOL 49 

VII CONFIRMATION 6o 

VIII ScHooL Days 72 

IX At THE Zoo 82 

X PSEUDO REFORMERS ........ 92 

XI UnITY 102 

XII Sanctity 109 

XIII Catholicity 118 

XIV ArosTouaTY 125 

XV ViSIBLE HeAD OP THE ChURCH .... I33 

XVI Infalubility 143 

XVII Veneration of Sacred I maces . . . .152 

XVIII Veneration of Relics and Invocation of 

Saints 162 

XIX Extréme Unction 171 

XX Indulgences 178 

XXI PURGATORY l8s 

XXII Immaculate Conception 194 

XXIII The. Rosary 205 

XXIV Fasting and Abstinence 212 

XXV Christian Ethics 220 

XXVI The Awakening 231 

MEMOIRS OF ZI PRETE

CHAPTER I 

ITALIAN QUARTER 

ON the south side of Forquer Street, Chi- 
cago, and nearly midway between Des- 
plaines and Halsted, there stands an unpreten- 
tious brick structure with a Romanesque faQade 
surmounted by a Roman cross. It is the Chiesa 
delľAngelo Custode. The mellow tints of sea 
and sky in the decoration of the interior f rom 
vestibule to sanctuary are unmistakably Italian. 
The stained-glass windows of St. Michael, St. 
Raphaely and of the Guardian Angel, carry the 
thoughts of the onlooker back to the basilicas 
of Rome and Florence and cause him to murmur 
the names of Italian masters. The statues of 
San Vito, Rocco, Lucia, and Sebastiano, recall 
vividly to mind those Christian martyrs espe- 
cially dear to the Italian heart, while Raphaeľs 
Madonna delia Sedia tenderly clasping her Di- 

M
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About Dominic Candeloro

Dominic Candeloro, 1401 Cleveland Avenue LaGrange Park, IL 60526 Candeloro@CasaItaliaChicago.org, dcandeloro@luc.edu 708-354-0952 Cell 847-951-910 http://tinyurl.com/candeloro 2012-13-Adjunct Prof. Italian American History, Loyola University Chicago 1981-present—Part-time volunteer program co-ordinator and librarian Italian Cultural Center at Casa Italia 2001-2006 Executive Director, American Italian Historical Association 2005-----Co Director of the Exhibit “The Dream...per non dementicare” Archivio Centrale dello Stato-Roma 1995-2003 Special Assistant to the Mayor of Chicago Heights Director, Conferences/Workshops & Weekend College, Governors State University Adjunct Professor of History 1977-1982 Visiting Assistant Professor - History, University of Illinois, Chicago.and Director of the "Italians in Chicago" Project, $300,000 NEH Grant (1979-1982). 1976-1977 Visiting Assistant Professor - History, University of Illinois, Urbana - Champaign. Ph.D. University of Illinois, Urbana - Champaign, History. Dissertation: ,Louis Freeland Post: Carpetbagger, Singletaxer, Progressive." J. Leonard Bates, Advisor. B.A. Northwestern University, 1982-1983 Fulbright Research Fellowship, Italy.

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